Journal of Medical Physics
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 275-278

An ideal blood mimicking fluid for doppler ultrasound phantoms


1 Dept. of Medical Physics, Hamedan University of Medical Science, Hamedan, Iran
2 Dept. of Medical Physics, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
H Samavat
Dept. of Medical Physics, Hamedan University of Medical Science, Hamedan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-6203.29198

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In order to investigate the problems of detecting tumours by ultrasound it is very important to have a portable Doppler flow test object to use as a standardising tool. The flow Doppler test objects are intended to mimic the flow in human arteries. To make the test meaningful, the acoustic properties of the main test object components (tissue and blood mimic) should match closely the properties of the corresponding human tissues, while the tube should ideally have little influence. The blood mimic should also represent the haemodynamic properties of blood. An acceptable flow test object has been designed to closely mimic blood flow in arteries. We have evaluated the properties of three blood mimicking fluid: two have been described recently in the literature, the third is a local design. One of these has emerged as being particularly well matched to the necessary characteristics for in-vitro work.


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